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5 Oz. of Pain Presents: The DUEL

Battling this week are two arch enemies in the form of Adam Morgan and Caleb Newby. Both want to rip the others throat out so this is a solid Duel made of hatred. Let us start….

1. Kimbo Slice will defeat Ken Shamrock in under 60 seconds.

Morgan: FALSE. Kimbo will most certainly destroy Ken Shamrock in convincing fashion via knockout but it won’t be under 60 seconds. Yes, his chin is glass and Kimbo will most likely touch it but we said the same thing about James Thompson and Thompson took several hard blows from Kimbo and kept on fighting. In Shamrock’s illustrious MMA career he has never been KO’d in under 60 seconds, even in losses to Tito Ortiz, Rich Franklin and heavy hitter Kazuyuki Fujita. Kimbo will need at least 60 seconds to feel Shamrock out and find an opening for him to capitalize upon. So while I do think that Kimbo will win in the first round via knockout, I highly doubt that it will be in less than a minute.

Newby: FALSE. 60 seconds is a pretty tough time frame to beat anyone in. We’ve seen enough fights that involve a 2+ minute initial feeling out process and who knows how long it will take Ken to fully engage Kimbo. I too will be taking Kimbo via first round KO but 60 seconds is a little ambitious for my taste. Up the ante to 120 seconds and I’d probably bite. So with that being said, how high would the hilarious factor be should Ken get a takedown and submit Kimbo early in the fight? Could there be anything worse for EliteXC’s future than having Ken easily defeat Kimbo? Not that I am looking for their demise, don’t get me wrong, but you have to admit the comedy factor would be huge. How many losses as Ken suffered in a row? Six? And to see him take down your poster boy badass? Priceless. That’s what makes this fight interesting to me; rooting for the near impossible upset just to see the look on Skala’s face after.

My Five Cents: Ken Shamrock has no chance in hell and it confuses me how anyone would think he does. Kimbo might well kill him…. which would be bad for the sport. I say he beats him in 60 seconds.

2. A Rampage Jackson vs. Shogun Rua rematch would go completely different from their first bout.

Morgan: TRUE. Inside a cage without soccer kicks and foot stomps, Shogun Rua is going to have to become a different fighter. Don’t get me wrong, he is one of the most impressive 205 lbs. fighters in the world today and his record speaks for itself. But Rampage is a different fighter than he was in PRIDE and his rib was broken in the first fight which allowed Rua to tee off on him without response from Rampage. Rampage has also proven himself inside the cage, beating top tier competition and winning the light heavyweight title in the process. Rua has yet to do that. I feel that should the two meet again, Rua will be under all the pressure and not Rampage. It will be a completely different fight and nothing like the last time the two met. Rua destroyed Jackson last time. This time it’s bound to be extremely competitive and it’s a matchup that hardcore fans would drool over.

Newby: TRUE. Morgan summed it up nicely. Rampage is a much better and evolved fighter than he was in their first fight that it is highly impossible for a rematch to duplicate the drubbing that Rampage took. Still, I am not thrilled about this fight. I’d rather see it when both fighters are coming off wins instead of losses to Forrest Griffin. Rampage vs. Shogun could be a mega fight of an epic level and instead it is of definite interest, but feels a little “meh”. These are still two of the best of the best at 205 and could have a much higher profile fight. I’d prefer to have Rampage get the immediate rematch vs. Forrest as was rumored and settle that razor thin contest. Still, what’s done is done and this will be a good one. It’s just too bad that one of these tremendous fighters will end up on a two fight lossing streak.

My Five Cents: Well played that they’re both coming off of a loss to Forrest Griffin. That’s fairly embarrassing.

3. The Muhammad Ali act is applicable for the sport of MMA.

Morgan: FALSE. I’m not going to pretend like I understand the Muhammad Ali Act in its entirety or what exactly the Ali Act would mean for MMA. I do know, however, that it was written for boxing, an entirely different sport than mixed martial arts. Do I believe someone should be taking a look at these contracts that fighters are signing a little more closely? Yes. Do I think someone should be regulating Dana White when he offers a ridiculously iron clad contract to these young fighters? Contracts that Matt Lindland referred to as “illegal”? Yes. But do I think it should come through a law that was written for a different sport entirely? No. The sport is still growing and as such there will be growing pains. I expect something like the Ali Act to be enforced at some point in time in MMA but to just copy and paste the same verbiage into a different sport isn’t right.

Newby: FALSE. And that’s about it, isn’t it? It was written for boxing, a different sport from mixed martial arts. MMA has taken many cues from boxing but that doesn’t make the sports interchangeable. There are many things about the Ali Act that sound good to enforce in MMA for fighter rights and is something that should be looked at, but as it stands now, it is just for boxing and not MMA. Until the federal government adds MMA to the Muhammad Ali Act verbage or writes a similar law specifically for MMA, the fighters are not protected. Boxing is not MMA, it’s that simple.

My Five Cents: Contact sports are contact sports and they should all be treated the same. I feel you’re both wrong.


4. It would be worth it for a mid-level organization to sign Tito Ortiz to a lucrative contract.

Newby: TRUE. Ortiz is a name and Ortiz sells tickets. As long as lucrative doesn’t equal ridiculous it is a huge way to put “asses in the seat” (copyright Tony Schiavone circa 1995). This seems to be the perfect time for me to take a slight detour on my “Tito is washed up” theory. Nearly everyone says Tito is no longer a top 10 light-heavyweight. Well of course, we can all agree on that. Then most go on to berate Tito for being a shell of his former self and no longer having any game. Hold on up there Poncho. Let’s look at the facts here. Since his UFC comeback run, Ortiz has defeated Forrest Griffin (who has vastly improved since), Ken Shamrock twice (no comment needed), and went to a draw against Rashad Evans (due to a one point penalty for holding the cage). Ortiz has lost to Chuck Liddell and Lyoto Machida. Again. Ortiz has lost to CHUCK LIDDELL and LYOTO MACHIDA. These are hardly two scrubs. Liddell has made a career out of defeating people of precisely Ortiz’s style and wrestling background while Machida has yet to be defeated. Not exactly the child’s play for Mr. Ortiz. The point being, while it may be possible that Ortiz is washed up, the jury is still out. And if Ken Shamrock can headline an event on prime time network television, Tito should have a cakewalk. Affliction, EliteXC, Strikeforce, it doesn’t matter, Tito is a name that will draw and is known to the casual fan. He was on The Apprentice on NBC, he is dating Jenna Jameson… Tito can still draw and provided a promoter can sign him without crippling the piggybank it should be a no brainer. Who knows, Ortiz could have a career rebirth along the way… provided you believe it is dead.

Morgan: FALSE. There’s one reason to buy Tito Ortiz’s services right now in MMA and that reason is to sell pay-per-views. Currently there are only two organizations who have run successful pay-per-views in MMA. One is the UFC, the other is Affliction. It would be unwise for a league like the AFL to throw big dollars at Ortiz because they have yet to establish pay-per-view. Well, that and they have a lot of money tied up in Bobby Lashley and Tara LaRosa. But beyond that it doesn’t make sense for a smaller promotion to waste a bunch of money on Ortiz especially when there is no one for him to fight in these smaller promotions. What the smaller promotions need to be focusing on is putting on great shows with developing talent. Ortiz vs. Gan McGee will put asses in the seats but for how long? And who will buy that pay-per-view?

My Five Cents: I think this is up in the air. Is Tito worth money because he can sell shows? Yes, but you’ll probably go bankrupt within two years. He’s not as good as he’s worth any longer.

5. Kenny Florian is correct that Roger Huerta used some type of illegal slippery substance in their bout.

Newby: FALSE. Ok, go with me on this one. First off, I don’t believe Florian has officially accused Huerta of using something, although he has implied it certainly. So this is my theory, and I have personal experience to back it up. Ready? Ok. Last year I covered a local MMA event in Minnesota. Most of you wouldn’t remember the event by name, WFC: Downtown Throwdown, but may remember it as the first of two events where Brad Imes won via gogoplata. I remember it as the event where someone was shot during the event (nearly canceling the show), trying to talk to Road Warrior Animal (he didn’t seem to care that I was a big fan a a kid), and meeting Roger Huerta. In my brief conversation with Huerta I shook his hand as we were introduced and in saying goodbye, and I was struck by a particularly strong thought during these handshakes: For a fighter, he has surprisingly soft hands, I bet he moisturizes. And if he does indeed moisturize and take care of himself, he may very well have softer and smoother skin than your average fighter Kenny is used to facing. And in a business full of so many rough and tumble toughguys it isn’t shocking that Kenny could mistake that for illegal greasing. No? Not buying it Morgan? Fine. How about the guy just sweats a lot? And he has never been accused of greasing before. Take your pick, or take all three. Either way, FALSE!

Morgan: TRUE. I’m actually a bit surprised that Florian would go and say something like this. He’s not the kind of guy to talk this kind of smack, especially after a decisive victory. That’s what makes me believe that Huerta may have used something to make him a little more slippery. That and the fact that Huerta hasn’t said a word in his own defense. I mean, usually when a fighter accuses an opponent of cheating then you almost immediately hear “Bullshit, I did” from the other side. Even if they are cheating (I’m looking at you, Sean Sherk) then they’re still adamant that they did nothing. But Huerta? Not a peep from him. It’s called acceptance. Don’t stir up the hornets nest because in the end you may just get exposed. Huerta was up to something, absolutely.

6. Eiji Mitsuoka is the current favorite to win the Sengoku LWGP.

Newby: TRUE. Who do I look like, Breen? Honesty time, I picked Damm over Mitsuoka in a tough decision. Still, I am comfortable riding Mitsuoka as my horse to the finals to win. I’d debate taking Satoru Kitaoka here but why not Mitsuoka? He had the hardest fight for the opening round which should give him some points as the favorite. And hey, he has a recent victory over the current king of the Japanese lightweight world, Joachim Hansen. One could make the arguement that defeating Hansen isn’t worthy of too much heaping praise, and that may be valid, but it’s still a feather in the cap.

Morgan: TRUE. Mitsuoka is the best fighter left of the group and he absolutely devastated a very tough fighter in Rodrigo Damm in the first round of the grand prix. Damm is a world class jiu jitsu fighter with solid standup and he got beat up on the feet and then submitted on the ground. Mitsuoka has to be the clear favorite and the most well rounded fighter with the most solid victories out of all the fighters left in the field.

My Five Cents: I am ashamed of both of you, how dare you bring up Mitsuoka with little mention of Breen as better than you. He is and I’m ashamed.

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