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UFC was closer to signing Brock Lesnar-Fedor Emelianenko than originally believed

Fedor Emelianenko - StrikeforceFor a chunk of time in 2012 rumors swirled about Brock Lesnar’s possible return to the Octagon after retiring in late 2011 with UFC President Dana White even admitting to having sat down with the former heavyweight champion. However, nothing ever came of the conversation other than for White to label it as being “one of the worst meetings” he’d ever had with Lesnar.

Almost a year removed from the story, White has decided to pull back the veil and reveal things did not go as badly with Lesnar as originally explained. In fact, the company came close to inking a bout between Lesnar and divisional icon Fedor Emelianenko with an eye on Dallas Stadium for the attached event.

“Remember when I met with him and said it didn’t go well? It actually went well. It went well, and Brock wanted to fight Fedor. Then (Fedor’s) dad died, and he was done,” said White to reporters after the press conference for UFC on FOX 6. “We were going to do the Fedor-Brock fight. Brock came down, we met, he came to that event, we went to dinner that night, and he went back home. We were negotiating the Fedor thing. And I think when he heard Fedor was done, he said, ‘I’m done, too.’”

MMAJunkie was on hand and able to capture the comments.

White went on to state he didn’t expect Lesnar or Emelianenko to fight again, making the match-up a moot point for the most part, but admitted he’d seen crazier things happen in the fight business.

“Anything’s possible. I don’t know. When a guy says he wants to retire, you’re never going to see me chasing a guy who said he wants to retire,” concluded White on the topic.

Lesnar was one of the UFC’s biggest draws during his stint in the organization, picking up wins over the likes of Shane Carwin, Randy Couture, and Frank Mir. Comparably, Emelianenko was considered to be the best heavyweight in MMA for years, exiting the sport with an overall mark of 34-4 with 26 stoppages to his credit.