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Roy Nelson’s UFC deal expires after Saturday night’s scrap

Roy Nelson’s UFC deal expires after Saturday night’s scrap

Heavyweight Roy Nelson was happy to step up on short notice and help the UFC out when the organization saw two of the featured fights at UFC 161 fall apart due to injury. However, after Saturday night, it may not matter considering Nelson could very well end up a free agent after the outing rather than a competitor the organization opts to retain.

As it turns out, Nelson’s match-up with Stipe Miocic will mark the final clash on the Ultimate Fighter winner’s original contract. Still, despite being offered an extension, “Big Country” is happy to let things play out rather than eliminate the risk of losing his spot on the company’s roster.

The 36-year old recently explained his rationale to the Las Vegas Sun, stating, “You’re working for a business and you’re getting paid $30 an hour, but you’re working for them and you’re an electrician and they’re charging $150 an hour. It doesn’t quite make sense.”

As far as how things will play out with the UFC, Nelson is letting his management take care of the issue instead of concerning himself with matters outside of the Octagon.

“I have no idea. I have people for that,” Nelson responded when asked about negotiations.

Nelson and UFC President Dana White have bumped heads on a handful of occasions, adding to fans’ concern about the possibility of the promotion wiping its proverbial hands clean of the rotund rumbler. Then again, with three straight first-frame knockouts behind him and another win potentially on the horizon, Nelson’s stock has never been higher.

Fans can catch what could be Nelson’s last fight in the UFC on the PPV portion of Saturday night’s show.

9 COMMENTS
  • THEGUNNER says:

    If he gets his job done nicely he deserves a raise.

    Agree or Disagree: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

  • AlphaOmega says:

    Normally I’d say that they’d go ahead and sign Big Country because he’s a pretty big name with very loyal fans, and he comes to fight and puts on exciting matches, even if he is a little controversial when it comes to Dana. However, this is Dana, who holds grudges worse then a woman, so I’m not sure how it’ll play out.

    Agree or Disagree: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

  • MCM says:

    I don’t think they’ll have av issue resigning Big Country. Dana loves fighters that put butts in seats and Roy has one of the largest fan bases of any UFC fighter. He’ll get resigned no problem.

    Agree or Disagree: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

  • waitetr says:

    I’m sure he’ll get resigned it just a matter of who’s in the driver’s seat when it comes time to negotiate. This all depends on if he wins or loses this next fight.

    Agree or Disagree: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  • AlphaOmega says:

    Even if he loses he should get resigned, if you look at just rankings and stuff, and not personalities or $ in pockets, there’s no reason a guy like Frankie who’s 1-3, should stay with the company and Big Country wouldn’t being 3-1.

    Agree or Disagree: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  • Richard Stabone says:

    “You’re working for a business and you’re getting paid $30 an hour, but you’re working for them and you’re an electrician and they’re charging $150 an hour. It doesn’t quite make sense.”

    In other words, Big Country’s compensation isn’t on par with the revenue the UFC generates. I’d agree with him on that.

    In the other major pro sports, when they hammer out their collective bargaining agreements, it ultimately leads to the owners and players splitting ALL revenue roughly 50/50. There’s of course lots of other factors, but the big fight is always about how to split the revenue pie.

    Well, in the UFC there’s no way in hell 50% of the revenue is going directly to fighter compensation. And maybe for a sports league that is still relatively new and working to expand, it’s perfectly reasonable that the revenue isn’t split that way, with the UFC investing a greater proportion of its resources into growth than the other sports leagues that have been established over decades of existence.

    But where the UFC is now at, with network TV deals, significant PPV revenue, major advertising deals with huge companies, etc… hopefully the fighter pay starts to catch up soon.

    As for Roy, win or lose next time out I think he (and his management) should definitely flirt with other MMA orgs if for no other reason than to use it as negotiating leverage. HW talent remains a scarcity, and you guys are right about Roy’s strong presence in MMA (large fanbase & exciting style of fighting). Roy turns 37 next month… this is his last (and probably first) chance at signing a deal for truly significant money, so he’s gotta be shrewd with how he plays this one big hand.

    Agree or Disagree: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

  • AlphaOmega says:

    “You’re working for a business and you’re getting paid $30 an hour, but you’re working for them and you’re an electrician and they’re charging $150 an hour. It doesn’t quite make sense.”

    That analogy has always annoyed me, it’s usually made by people who don’t understand what a business is, and don’t realize the bills/employment they have to pay out of the money they make.

    Also you still can’t compare MMA to other pro sports Richard, all the others have one major organizing head running the grand scheme and implementing rules, so they can do better payouts, and still not hurt their bottom line, MMA isn’t that way though yet.

    Agree or Disagree: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  • MCM says:

    It is a bad analogy Alpha but his point is not without merit. Just to add some more fuel to Richards fire, check out this article from Fightlinker.

    http://fightlinker.com/check-out-this-fans-breakdown-of-ufc-fighter-pay/

    Agree or Disagree: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  • Richard Stabone says:

    Also you still can’t compare MMA to other pro sports Richard, all the others have one major organizing head running the grand scheme and implementing rules, so they can do better payouts, and still not hurt their bottom line, MMA isn’t that way though yet.

    I’m not quite sure what you mean by that. If by organizing head you mean the commissioner, the commissioner is selected (via vote) by the owners. These other pro sports have two main entities – the players (represented by a union) and the owners (represented by the commish). When it comes to divvying up the revenue, the union negotiates with the owners and they hammer things out… which as I mentioned above has led to a nearly 50/50 split that varies a bit across the various sports leagues.

    The link MCM shared is pretty alarming. The methodology used to come up with the final analysis is probably more of a swag than fully accurate, but still… holy crap.

    Without a union, each UFC fighter is an independent contractor who (along with his management team if he’s reached a level to be able to afford it) will do his/her best to work out the best deal they can with the UFC suits. Of course, with the current MMA landscape, the UFC holds all the leverage in almost every instance.

    Agree or Disagree: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

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